Coding is for Everybody: Learning through Creating, Personalizing, Sharing, and Reflecting with Scratch

About this Series

Many people view computer programming as a narrow technical skill, useful only for a small subset of the population. But coding can be for everyone, enabling people with diverse interests to develop new strategies for thinking, learning, and expressing themselves. In this month-long series of activities and discussions, we’ll explore how and what young people learn as they program and share interactive stories, games, animations, and simulations -- and how educators can support young people as they design, share, and learn. We'll focus on experiences with the Scratch programming language and the ScratchEd community for educators who help others learn with Scratch.

Monthly Webinar Series

Calendar

Creating
4:00 PM PST
Event link: Check out the full recap
Featuring Mitch Resnick and Karen Brennan: What is possible with Scratch?
4:00 PM PST
Week 2: Personalizing
Event link: Check out the full recap
What are the diverse ways youth are creating with Scratch?
4:00 PM PST
Week 3: Sharing
Event link: Check out the full recap
Learning to code can be supported in a wide range of settings.
4:00 PM PST
Week 4: Reflecting
Event link: Check out the full recap
Gathering experiences & best practices for learning with Scratch

Partners

Scratch is a programming language that makes it easy to create your own interactive stories, animations, games, music, and art -- and share your creations on the web. Scratch is developed by the Lifelong Kindergarten Group at the MIT Media Lab.
The ScratchEd online community and other Scratch educator resources are developed by the ScratchEd Team at the Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Bios

Mitch Resnick is the LEGO Papert Professor of Learning Research and head of the Lifelong Kindergarten group at the MIT Media Lab. He explores how new technologies can engage people in creative learning experiences. He co-founded the Computer Clubhouse project, a worldwide network of after-school centers where youth from low-income communities learn to express themselves creatively with new technologies. Mitch also helped develop Scratch, an online community where children program and share interactive stories, games, and animations. You can Follow him on Twitter at @mres.

Karen Brennan is an Assistant Professor at Harvard University in the Graduate School of Education, and completed her PhD at the MIT Media Lab in the Lifelong Kindergarten group. Karen studies how participation in the Scratch online community and how professional development for educators can support young people as creators of computational media. You can Follow her on Twitter at @karen_brennan.